Changes to IR35 legislation and its impact on employers

In October 2018 the government confirmed that it will be extending the off-payroll rules to the private sector.

As of 6 April 2020, clients in the private sector will be responsible for assessing the IR35 Status of their contractors. For those deemed to be working inside IR35, the client will need to ensure they deduct all tax and National Insurance contributions due. The draft legislation was published on the 11th of July 2019.

Read more about who the IR35 legislation affects

Posted in General, Home Page, Homepage, Industry News, News

Just graduated and interested in working in Pharma?

Here are some career paths to consider.

Finishing university and finding your first job in Pharma as a graduate is a challenging period for most. With so many options available to you, how do you choose which roles to apply for?

To help you make that all-important decision, we have asked real life pharma experts to give us a bit of insight into their job roles and explain how they got there.

A Research Scientist

We recently interviewed Harpal, a research scientist Graduate working for a global biopharmaceutical company.

His job involves performing and optimising biochemical assays for analysing compounds. He chose a career in research as he wanted to be involved in discovering new concepts.

Although the job is very technical, planning and executing experiments, analysing data and writing reports, there is also an element of team work. Harpal liaises on a daily basis with his team and line manager to discuss progress.

Are you also interested in pursuing a career as a Research Scientist?

Prior to becoming a Research Scientist, Harpal completed a PhD and then found relevant industry experience in his field of research. He adds that if you are interested in performing biochemical assays, it’s important to understand FRET biochemical assays and data interpretation.

A starting point for becoming a Research Scientist might be to look at PhDs in the subjects that interest you the most. By doing a PhD, you would gain that valuable lab experience.

A Stability Analyst

Katie works for a pharmaceutical company as a stability analyst, measuring the stability of different products manufactured at the facility. She tests different batches at different time points and conditions, to assess whether there are any changes in the content.

The role is fast paced and involves a lot of focus, so is ideal for someone who enjoys working under pressure and has a keen eye for detail.

Interested in becoming a stability analyst? Recruitment managers would typically look for someone with a chemistry degree or pharmaceutical sciences as well as prior experience in an analytical pharma laboratory.

A Laboratory Analyst

Anthony is a laboratory analyst, working for a company who develops vaccines and healthcare products.

He is responsible for conducting all quality testing on products, writing up data and reporting the results. These results are then used to determine the quality of the product, and make decisions on whether the product is deemed safe to be used by patients.

Anthony finds his job particularly satisfying, knowing that he is contributing to helping people’s quality of life.

Interested in this role?

To apply to this type of job, you would be expected to have a chemistry qualification or pharmaceutical sciences and specific experience in the use and maintenance of HPLC systems. Anthony gained his qualification and relevant experience through an Apprenticeship scheme, proving that the typical university route is not the only way to a successful job in chemistry.

An Associate Scientist

Sarah works as an associate scientist for a company that researches and develops pharmaceutical products.

Her role involves collating information to create knowledge transfer packages for clients. She uses a variety of systems to search for product information, to compile comprehensive reports.

She chose this role as she enjoys the challenge of piecing together information as well as the customer interaction.

Sarah explains that this type of role is ideal for someone analytical, who wishes to work in science but also be customer facing.

Interested in this role?

To get to this position, Sarah did a degree in chemistry and additional training in project management. She then gained experience in product delivery within a contract manufacturing organisation.

A Regulatory Affairs Associate

Alaa is a contractor currently working for a science-led global healthcare company. As a Regulatory Affairs Associate, he ensures Over the Counter Medicines (OTC) are maintained, renewed on time and regulated by Health Authorities in different countries globally.

His day-to-day involves liaising with affiliates from different markets globally to meet deadlines, as well as working with internal stakeholders to improve processes for the company.

According to Alaa, a Regulatory Affairs Associate role would suit someone who is target driven, enjoys helping people but doesn’t need to be micro-managed.

Prior to this job, Alaa graduated with a degree in Forensic Biology and has a variety of experience from lab work to project management roles.  He also worked abroad, which helps him stand out from the crowd.

A life science or pharmaceutical science degree would also be considered for a career in regulatory affairs.

Feeling inspired? Why not read the interviews in full, as well as many others on our careers section. You can also have a look at available jobs or create a CK+ account, to find jobs tailored to your experience.

Posted in Articles, Candidates, Careers Advice, Home Page, Homepage, Homepage Candidates, News

How to find a graduate job in Science after University

Congratulations, you are about to graduate from university.

But what now?

Leaving university and finding your first graduate role in Science is a daunting process. With so many opportunities out there, where do you start looking?

Moreover, once friends start receiving job offers and family start questioning you about your own future, the pressure really builds up.

A job might no longer be for life, but your first job is the first stepping stone for your career path, and not a decision to take lightly. After all, you do spend a third of your life at work, so choosing something that interests you and leads to your dream job is vital.

As a starting point, we suggest creating a simple 4-step job-finding strategy. This will help you stay focused and engaged, and give you the necessary space to make that all-important decision.

Step 1: Do your research
We know, this is easier said than done!

This initial step is all about research and finding out what options are available to you.

Popular dilemmas for graduating scientists are firstly whether to work in research or not, and secondly whether to work in academia or industry.

Additionally, apart from the obvious decisions regarding what role to choose, there are other factors to consider such as ‘where’ you wish to work – for example, would you consider a role abroad? And what kind of environment do you work best in – somewhere fast-paced or somewhere where you can take your time?

If you have done internships while working and have some working experience, answers to these questions might be clearer. If not, there are other ways to carry out research, such as:

A. Getting in touch with a recruiter
A good place to start is to speak to a specialist recruiter. Not only will they give you a better feel for the different jobs available to graduates, they will also take the time to mentor you.

Our recruitment consultants at CK have years of experience matching graduates to roles in the science industry, and therefore are best placed to give you credible advice. They will act as your guiding hand during the whole recruitment process, from looking for jobs to applying, and are here to answer all your questions during this daunting time.

B. Reaching out to your network
When searching for a job, you will most probably have been reminded of the old proverb “it’s not about what you know, it’s about who you know”. We would always recommend proactively engaging with your contacts to ask for advice, whether that be to better understand different roles or to ask if they know of any job openings. Most people are willing to discuss their careers, give advice and answer any questions.

C. Attending career fairs
Many universities will organise career fairs for their students. This is a brilliant opportunity to talk to experts in the industry, to get a feel for the different types of companies and roles available to you, and more importantly, to ask questions!

For more information read how to make the most of careers fairs.

Step 2: Start your applications
After your initial research, you should have a good understanding of the different roles available to graduates, and which of those roles interest you. And now it’s time to start applying.

The science job market is a very competitive job market, especially for recent graduates with little experience.

At this early stage in your career, the aim is to gain as much experience as possible, to build up to your dream role. With that in mind, we would suggest applying to as many opportunities as possible in the field that interests you. To avoid disappointment, remember to apply to jobs suitable to your level of experience and field of expertise.

To increase your chances of finding that ideal first job, our advice would be to not just look at opportunities close to home, but to also look further afield.

If you struggle to find job opportunities, get in touch with CK and we can help find those opportunities for you. This will help you from feeling overwhelmed.

Step 3: Tailor your application
So many people start their job search by updating their CV and resume. But without knowing which jobs you are applying for, this makes little sense.

Hiring managers and recruiters receive hundreds of applications for every graduate job, leaving them only a few seconds to scan each CV and resume. In this competitive job market, make yours count by tailoring it and keeping it succinct.

As well as thinking about your individual skills and experience, this means finding out more about the company and demonstrating an understanding of their business, their challenges and the broader sector in which they operate.

Step 4: Don’t give up
Rejections happen, especially when you are applying for a lot of jobs at the same time. Try not to get disheartened but instead think about why you might have been rejected, and how you can improve your application for the next job.

If you have made it past the first stages of the application, ask the hiring manager for feedback.

Applying for your first job is not easy, but remember, once you have found that dream graduate role, all that job-finding stress will be long forgotten about.

Search for jobs on CK Science

Visit our Careers Zone

Posted in Articles, Candidates, Careers Advice, General, Home Page, Homepage, Homepage Candidates, News

6 Ways Managers Can Help Reduce Stress in the Workplace

Your staff are your strongest asset. The benefits of having healthy and happy employees are endless. Predominately, happy and healthy staff are proven to be more motivated, productive and take less sick leave, which in turn makes them more profitable.

Likewise, happy staff will become your biggest advocates, not only bringing in clients but also new recruits.

Intermittent stress at work is normal and can be a good thing. It energises people, motivates them and helps them focus.

On the other hand, persistent stress in the workplace can be expensive. Accumulated days off, unproductive staff and high staff turnover can quickly affect a company’s profit margins. In fact, 57% of lost working days between 2017 to 2018 in the UK were due to stress, the highest level on record.

There has never been a more important time for employers to make reducing stress in the workplace a priority.

Here are CK’s top recommendations for managers to follow, to reduce stress in the workplace.

 

  1. Helping staff manage their time

The predominant cause of stress in the UK is pressure related to excess workload at work (44% of stress cases to be exact). Regular tight deadlines and the constant feeling of ‘not doing enough’ can quickly mount up, and become a mental health concern.

The second most cited cause for stress in the workplace is a lack of managerial support. As a manager, understanding you employees’ main stressors and working with them to eliminate these will not only show your team that you care, but will also encourage them to be more productive.

A simple solution can be setting reasonable deadlines and giving your staff enough time to complete each task properly, to avoid them from feeling overwhelmed with long to-do lists. Another good time management method is to start every morning with a short planning meeting, where you set out the requirements and what is expected of each employee ahead of the day.

 

  1. Communicating clearly with employees

As an employee, being kept in the dark and not knowing where you stand can be a major cause for anxiety. Likewise, managers can also feel stressed if they don’t have a clear understanding of what their team is up to.

The best way to avoid this two-way stress is regular communication. This can be done via workshops or one-to-one interviews, questioning your staff on how they feel at work, what they wish to achieve and what you expect from them.

Being transparent with employees and setting out clear goals is an excellent way to relieve stress for both parties.

 

  1. Allowing flexi-time and remote working when required

Nowadays, everyone is looking for that flexibility at work. Letting staff choose their working hours means they can work to a less stressful schedule that best suits them. For example, they can avoid the morning rush hour or work around family requirements. As a result, they can come to work more focused.

Not all organisations are able to offer this perk, but for those who can, this has been a proven method to help reduce stress levels up.

Furthermore, allowing employees to occasionally work from home is another proven way to successfully motivate them and help them feel more relaxed whilst at work.

 

  1. Creating a stress-free environment

After a stressful period, your brain will continue to play the stressful experience for an hour afterwards. To avoid developing chronic stress, stress expert Dr Mithu Storoni suggests always following up an episode of stress with another enjoyable intense activity, to engage your mind in something else and avoid rethinking about the stressful episode.

Providing staff with an area to relax and engage in fun activities, such as a table tennis area, after a period of stress will allow them to recover from a stressful episode.

More importantly, keeping the stress period to as short a time period as possible avoids the brain seeing stress as a major threat, and will allow it to be less reactive to future stressors.

Does your office allow your employees a place and the time to recharge after moments of stress?

 

  1. Encouraging staff to stay active

Research has proven that the best ways to reduce stress are by exercising and meditating. Studies have shown exercise reduces fatigue, improves alertness and concentration, and enhances individuals’ general cognition, all contributing to keeping the brain energized and avoiding the negative effects of stress.

Introducing workplace wellness schemes like discounted gym memberships or a lunchtime running club are good ways to encourage your staff to keep active. Other ways could include an office step count competition, organising charity runs or an active day out.

 

  1. Encouraging social activity at work

According to the NHS, spending time with friends helps us relax and alleviate some of the stress we feel from day-to-day life. Therefore if people enjoy spending time with their coworkers, they will feel more relaxed at work.

All in all, encouraging staff to interact with one another and be sociable will improve the office morale and boost employee satisfaction. This in turn improves employment retention and supports recruitment campaigns.

Posted in Articles, General, Home Page, Homepage, Homepage Clients, News

New Year, New Job

The New Year often signals a sign for change, a new challenge or an exciting opportunity. It therefore isn’t a surprising that January is the most popular month to make a career move.

A survey by Gallup showed that 85% of workers worldwide admitted to not enjoying their jobs, with ‘lack of job satisfaction’ being cited as the number one reason for wanting to change roles.

If you are feeling the January blues and are particularly interested in a fulfilling career within the scientific and clinical industry, as with any goal the first step to success is organization and planning.

Here are our top five things you should consider whilst looking for your new job:

 

  1. Know what you are looking for

First and foremost, to ensure you find a job that satisfies you, you need to do a bit of introspection and understand what exactly you want to achieve from it. For example:

  • Are you wanting a change of career/industry or just a different position?
  • What interests you?
  • What skills and experience do you have to offer?
  • Would you be willing to re-train or go back to study to get the position you want?
  • How much responsibility are you willing to take on?

 

  1. Find a job which you will find rewarding, even when times are not so rosy

We spend a substantial portion of our life at work, a third of our lives to be exact. It is therefore important that you find your job enjoyable and rewarding.

However, chances are you will never love every aspect of your work – whether it’s the admin side of the job, the long hours or the people you work with. People who tend to focus on those negative areas rather than being grateful for the positives are more likely to feel depressed and discouraged. It is important you find a role that is professionally and personally rewarding, but it’s also important to remember to focus on the areas you like and not just those you don’t.

 

  1. Find a job that adds balance to your life

Your job and career are an important part of your life, they give you a sense of purpose and money to pay your bills and do things you enjoy. However, when looking for a new job it is important to consider the balance between work and play. For example, if you are currently very overwhelmed and stressed in your workplace, think about looking for a job with less responsibility, or flexible hours. Although this may result in a pay cut, it will improve your overall work-life balance.

 

  1. Find a job that offers the opportunity to learn and grow

A study by Quantum Workplace showed employees listed growth opportunity as one of their highest drivers of engagement. This could take the form of:

  1. Financial growth – increased income related to performance, or promotional opportunities
  2. Career growth – moving up the ranks in the organization, more significant duties, increased job titles
  3. Professional knowledge growth – ensuring you can increase your knowledge in your field

If these are important to you, when applying for a job remember to ask what the opportunities are for progression and training.

 

  1. Does the company culture fit your personality?

Company culture defines the environment in which employees work; some companies have a relaxed team-based culture, and some a strict corporate management style.

It is important to do your research about a company’s culture when job searching. This can be done by looking on sites such as Glassdoor for reviews.

You are much more likely to enjoy time in your workplace and have high job satisfaction if the company culture is one that you enjoy and can relate to.

 

  1. The company’s values align with yours

Many people these days favour a more meaningful career over the option of climbing the corporate ladder. To increase your job satisfaction, it is important that your personal values are in line with the company’s values. The best way to define this is to:

Step 1– Take time to identify your personal core values; what do you place importance on, what values do you dislike etc.

Step 2– Familiarize yourself with your organization’s values; what matters most to the firm, how do they treat employers, what area of the company do they invest most in.

Step 3– Create a plan; if there are certain attributes or values that are extremely important to you, ensure your workplace places importance on them too.

By following these steps, you will hopefully find a company with the same values as yourself, making life at work much more rewarding.

Many organizations start their recruitment process at this time of year, so it’s a great time to take stock and re-evaluate what you really want. By following our tips and advice, you can make sure you’re clear on what you want and be prepared to grab the opportunity when the right one comes around.

If you are aiming for a fresh start in your career in 2019 keep an eye on our job listings here . We can help you to kick-start your job search in the right way.

Posted in Articles, Candidates, General, Home Page, Homepage Candidates, News

CK Science is the leading independent specialist recruiter for science jobs.

Looking for the next step up the scientific career ladder, a first science job a change of direction in your career in science, maybe your first pharmaceutical job, or are you wanting to gain some industrial experience after becoming a science graduate?

CK Science team of trained recruiters and career consultants are here to help you achieve your career goals.

For the past 15 years CK Science has combined class leading service levels with a dedicated team of qualified recruiters, to offer scientific recruitment solutions that continue to exceed the expectations of even its most demanding clients and applicants.We handle vacancies across the scientific arena, including:

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